WCZ Specials countdown: Player particulars

author-image
Women's CricZone Staff
New Update
WCZ Specials countdown: Player particulars
© Women's CricZone © Women's CricZone

Sornnarin Tippoch (Thailand)

Jersey no.1, Sornnarin Tippoch is the captain of the Thailand side. She has captained them in every single one of their 39 T20I matches, even leading them to a record 17 wins on the trot to surpass Australia's previous mark of 16 consecutive wins in the format. She is the most economical among all the Thailand bowlers with a minimum of five overs under their belt. She was the joint-leading wicket taker in ICC Women's T20 World Cup Asia Region Qualifier 2019 with 13 wickets from six matches. Under her leadership, Thailand became the first team from South-East Asian region to play in a global ICC tournament when they played their first match against West Indies at the 2020 T20 World Cup. Thailand won all their group matches in the ICC Women’s T20 World Cup Qualifier in 2019 to qualify for the event.

34-year-old Tippoch won a lot of admirers for the way she led the Thailand side on and off the field during the 2020 T20 World Cup in Australia. She has scored 226 runs and has taken 39 wickets at an average of 11.43-including two four-wicket hauls from 39 T20Is.

 

© Women's CricZone © Women's CricZone

Alex Blackwell (Australia)

Alex Blackwell, jersey no.2, is the most experienced player in the history of Australia with 251 international caps to her name. In 2003, she scored a patient 58 off 236 balls in her second Test to help Australia draw the Test match and win the series 1-0. No player has played more ODIs for Australia than her. She is the fourth-highest run-getter for Australia in the format. She led Australia to their first T20 World Cup trophy in 2010 when regular skipper Jodie Fields missed the tournament due to injury. Her 61-run knock in the semi-final against India was instrumental in Australia reaching the final. She won two more T20 World Cups with Australia in 2012 and 2014 and also became the second player from Australia to go past 1000 runs in T20Is in 2014. During the 2015 Ashes series, Blackwell became the first player from Australia to play in 200 internationals. She announced her retirement from international cricket in the year 2018. She represented Sydney Thunder in the Women’s Big Bash League (WBBL) and scored more than 300 runs for them in every season.

A solid middle-order batter, Blackwell scored 5250 runs-including three hundreds and 30 fifties in international cricket. She was also part of two ODI World Cup triumphs, featuring in the victorious Australia sides in 2005 and 2013 World Cups.

 

© Women's CricZone © Women's CricZone

Mithali Raj (India)

The number three has become synonymous with India's Mithali Raj, the leading run-scorer in ODIs with 6888 runs to her name. During the 2017 World Cup, she went past England’s Charlotte Edwards to become the highest run-getter in the world. She is the only batter in the world with more than 6000 runs in the format. In 2019, she became the first player to play 200 ODIs. She once scored a record seven consecutive fifties in ODI cricket. No player has scored more fifties than her in the format. She also holds the record for the most number of ODI centuries by an Indian batter. Having announced her arrival with a century on debut at the age of 16, Raj has become one of the greatest batters to have played the game. In 2003, she broke the record for the highest individual score in Tests during her 214-run knock against England in Taunton. It is still the highest score by an Indian in Tests. She hit the winning run during the 2006 Test in Taunton to register India’s first win against England in Tests. She finished her T20I career as the highest run-getter for India in the format. She has captained India in a record 170 internationals across formats and led them to two World Cup finals in 2005 and 2017. She also captained India in three T20 World Cups.

A batter known for her consistency and longevity in a career spanning over 20 years, Raj has scored 9915 runs, including eight hundreds and 74 fifties from 308 international matches across formats. In 2003, she became the recipient of the Arjuna Award and was conferred with the prestigious Padma Shri in 2015.

 

publive-image © Women's CricZone

Panna Ghosh (Bangladesh)

Bangladesh’s Panna Ghosh, jersey no.4, is a tall right-arm medium pace bowler known for her ability to bowl economic spells. She is one of the most experienced players in the Bangladesh side and was part of the squad when they secured ODI status in 2011. She featured in Bangladesh's first ever international match against Ireland during the 2011 ICC World Cup Qualifier. She was a member of the Bangladesh squad when they won the 2018 T20 Asia Cup defeating defending champions India. She was the player of the match when Bangladesh defeated Ireland in the final of the 2018 T20 World Cup Qualifiers. Her spell of 5 for 16 in the match is the best bowling figures by a Bangladesh player in T20Is. She also became the second Bangladesh player to take a five-wicket haul in T20Is during the spell. She holds the record for the highest individual score (23) by a number eleven batter in ODIs.

30-year-old Ghosh has represented Bangladesh in 68 international matches in her career so far and has taken 48 wickets. She was also part of the Bangladesh squads that made it to the T20 World Cups in 2014, 2016 and 2020.

 

© Women's CricZone © Women's CricZone

Sana Mir (Pakistan)

Sana Mir, Pakistan's jersey no.5, is the leading wicket taker for her country in ODIs. In 2017, she became the first and only cricketer to take 100 wickets in ODIs for Pakistan. When she reached that milestone she also joined the select band of cricketers to achieve the rare double of scoring 1000 runs and taking 100 wickets in ODIs. In 2018, she became the first player from Pakistan to be ranked number one in ICC ODI bowling ranking. Only two players have taken more four-wicket hauls than her in their ODI career. Mir. who recently retired from international cricket, finished her career as the third-highest run-getter for Pakistan in the format. In 2015, she became the second bowler from Pakistan to take a T20I hat-trick during her spell of 4 for 14 against Sri Lanka. Only Nida Dar has taken more wickets than her in T20Is. She captained Pakistan in 137 international matches across limited overs formats. She is the only player to captain Pakistan in more than 50 matches in both formats. She was the captain of the side in 2013 and 2017 ODI World Cups and also captained them in first five T20 World Cups starting from the inaugural tournament in 2009.

An inspirational leader and an off-spinning allrounder, Mir scored 2432 runs and took 240 wickets-including 11 four-wicket hauls and one five-wicket haul. She represented Pakistan in three ODI World Cups and six T20 World Cups.

 

publive-image © Women's CricZone

Beth Mooney (Australia)

Australia’s jersey no.6, Beth Mooney, is currently the number one ranked T20I batter in the world. She was named the player of the tournament for her performance during the T20 World Cup 2020. She scored 259 runs at an average of 64.75 and a strike rate of 125.71, highest by a batter in a single edition of the tournament. She was named ICC Women’s T20I Cricketer of the Year and won the inaugural Emerging Cricketer of the Year in 2017. She was selected as the reserve wicket-keeper during the 2014 T20 World Cup squad but made her debut for Australia only in 2016. Even though a wicket-keeper by trade, Mooney has now established herself as one of the best batters in the world. She is the second-highest run-getter in the history of Women’s Big Bash League (WBBL). She was the player of the final for her match-winning 65 off 46 balls during WBBL04 when Brisbane Heat won their first title. She repeated the feat during the fifth edition of the tournament to help Heat win back-to-back trophies. She was also the top scorer of the T20 World Cup 2020 final when Australia defeated India to clinch their fifth title.

26-year-old Mooney has scored 2608 runs, including three hundreds and 18 fifties from 89 internationals across formats. Apart from her player of the tournament performance in the 2020 edition, she was part of Australia’s T20 World Cup squad during their triumphs in 2014 and 2018. She also represented Australia in 2016 T20 World Cup and 2017 Women's World Cup.

 

publive-image © Women's CricZone

Harmanpreet Kaur (India)

Harmanpreet Kaur, jersey no.7, became the first Indian player to score a century in T20Is during the T20 World Cup 2018. She is also the first player from India to play 100 T20I matches. She is currently the second-highest run-getter for India in the format. In 2012, she led India for the first time during their triumph against Pakistan in the T20 Asia Cup final. She took India to the semi-final of the T20 World Cup 2018 and India finished as the runners-up in 2020 under her leadership. In 2016, she became the first Indian to play in an overseas T20 league when she represented Sydney Thunder in the Women’s Big Bash League. Her match haul of 9 for 85 against South Africa during the 2014 Test match in Mysore is the best figures by an Indian spinner in Tests. It is also the best Test match bowling figures by an Indian at home. Her epic knock of an unbeaten 171 against Australia in Derby during the 2017 World Cup semi-final is considered to be one of the greatest innings in the history of the game. It’s the highest individual score by a batter in the knockout stages of a global tournament. Her performance was instrumental in India’s run through the tournament and their eventual runners-up finish.

An aggressive batting allrounder, Kaur has scored 4584 runs, including four hundreds and 17 fifties and has taken 61 wickets from 215 matches across formats. She was conferred with the prestigious Arjuna award in 2017. She was also part of the India's squads during the 2009 and 2013 Cricket World Cups and has represented India in all the T20 World Cups till date.

 

publive-image © Women's CricZone

Ellyse Perry (Australia)

Australia’s Ellyse Perry, jersey no.8, became the first player to win ICC Women’s Cricketer of the Year twice when she won the Rachael Heyhoe-Flint Award in 2019 having previously won it in 2017. She also won the ODI Cricketer of the Year in 2019. In 2007, she made her debut as a 16-year-old to become the youngest player to play international cricket for Australia. She won the player of the final for her spell of 3 for 18 when Australia won their first T20 World Cup in 2010 defeating New Zealand. She is the leading wicket-taker for Australia in T20Is. She is the only cricketer to have achieved the double of scoring 1000 runs and taking 100 wickets in the format. She is also one of the nine allrounders with this feat in ODIs. Only Cathryn Fitzpatrick has taken more wickets than her for Australia in ODI cricket. She holds the record for the highest individual score for Australia in Test matches. She plays for Sydney Sixers in the Women’s Big Bash League (WBBL) and led the side to two consecutive titles. She also won two back-to-back player of the tournament awards in the competition.

One of the greatest allrounders in the history of the game, Perry has scored 4864 runs including four hundreds and 33 fifties and has taken 297 wickets, with five five-wicket hauls from 240 international matches across formats. She was part of the Australian side that won the 2013 World Cup and has been an integral part of Australia in all their T20 World Cup triumphs.

 

publive-image © Women's CricZone

Afy Fletcher (West Indies)

West Indies' jersey no.9, Afy Fletcher, is a leg-spinner known for her frugal bowling. She holds the record for the best figures by a West Indies player on ODI debut. She made her debut as a 21-year-old in 2008 and took 4 for 22 against Ireland in Dublin. She was a key member of the West Indies side during the 2016 T20 World Cup when they won their maiden global title. She took seven wickets from six matches at an average of 11.42 and an economy rate of 4.84 in the tournament. In 2017, her career-best bowling figures of 5 for 13 during the second T20I helped West Indies win the series against Sri Lanka.

Having made her comeback in 2015, Fletcher has now become an integral part of West Indies bowling attack. In 101 internationals, she has taken 103 wickets. Apart from 2016 T20 World Cup, she has represented West Indies in 2009 and 2017 ODI World Cups and 2018, 2020 T20 World Cups.

 

publive-image © Women's CricZone

Holly Colvin (England)

Holly Colvin, jersey no.10, became the youngest player to represent England in international cricket when she made her debut at the age of 15 during the first Test of the 2005 Ashes series against Australia in Hove. She hit the winning run in the final against New Zealand during 2009 Women's World Cup and played an important role in England’s successful campaign taking nine wickets from seven matches. She was the highest wicket taker in the inaugural Women's T20 World Cup in 2009 and her nine wickets at an average of 11.77 were instrumental in England winning the tournament. Among spinners, only Danielle Hazell took more wickets than her for England in ODIs. In 2015, she officially announced her retirement at the age of 26 to take up the post of Women’s Cricket Senior Officer at International Cricket Council (ICC). She is currently serving the role of ICC’s Women’s Cricket Manager.

An accurate slow-left arm orthodox spinner, Colvin took 174 wickets including four four-wicket hauls from 127 international matches across formats. Apart from playing important role in England’s twin wins in 2009, she also represented them in the 2013 ODI World Cup and 2010, 2012 T20 World Cups.

 

publive-image © Women's CricZone

Merissa Aguilleira (West Indies)

Jersey no.11, Merissa Aguilleira, holds the record for the most number of dismissals as a wicket-keeper in the history of West Indies cricket. In 2018, she became the first West Indies wicket-keeper to go past 100 dismissals in ODIs. She is one of the five players to have achieved this feat in ODIs. Having made her debut in 2008 as a 22-year-old, Aguilleira made some important contributions with the bat over the years. She finished her career as the third-highest run-getter for West Indies in the format. She captained West Indies in a record 147 internationals across formats while keeping the wicket in 136 of those. No other wicket-keeper has led their country in more matches. Under her leadership, West Indies reached the final of the 2013 World Cup and finished as runners-up after losing the final against Australia. She also led West Indies to three T20 World Cup semi-finals in 2010, 2012 and 2014. She announced her retirement from international cricket in 2019.

Exceptional behind the wickets and gritty in front of it, Aguilleira scored 2520 runs, including six fifties from 207 matches across formats. She accounted for 172 dismissals as a wicket-keeper, which includes 112 catches and 60 stumpings from 188 internationals. In 2016, she was part of the West Indies squad that won the T20 World Cup in India.

 

© Women's CricZone © Women's CricZone

Shikha Pandey (India)

India’s Shikha Pandey, jersey no.12, is a bowling allrounder known for her ability to swing the ball. Having made her debut for India in 2014, Pandey has now established herself as one of the key members of the side. During her Test debut in 2014, she shared an important 68-run partnership with captain Mithali Raj in the second innings to guide India home against England in Wormsley. In the same year, her allround performance during the second ODI against South Africa in Bangalore helped India level the series at 1-1. Among Indian pace bowlers, only Jhulan Goswami and Amita Sharma have taken more wickets than her in ODIs and she is the quickest Indian to reach fifty wickets mark among the pacers. In 2019, her career-best figures of 4 for 18 helped India win the ICC ODI Championship series against England in Mumbai. In T20Is, she made a stellar comeback to the side after being dropped for the 2018 T20 World Cup. She took seven wickets from five matches at an average of 19.42 during the 2020 T20 World Cup in Australia.

31-year-old Pandey has scored 750 runs - including two fifties - and has taken 113 wickets from 104 international matches across formats. She was part of both Indian sides that finished as runners-up in the 2017 ODI World Cup and 2020 T20 World Cup.

 

© Women's CricZone © Women's CricZone

Nannapat Koncharoenkai (Thailand)

Thailand’s jersey no.13, Nannapat Koncharoenkai, is a wicketkeeper-batter known for her impeccable skills with the gloves. She made her debut as a 17-year-old during the 2018 T20 Asia Cup and her three stumpings and two run-outs helped Thailand defeat Sri Lanka in the group stages of the tournament, their first win against a full member side. She accounted for the most number of dismissals in T20Is in 2019 with a total of 29 dismissals in 23 matches. Since her debut, only India’s Taniya Bhatia and Australia’s Alyssa Healy have more wicket-keeping dismissals than her in the format. In 2019, she scored a match-winning 43-ball 57 - her maiden fifty in international cricket-against Netherlands during the T20I Quadrangular Series. She was part of the Thailand side when they broke the record of Australia by winning 17 consecutive T20I matches.

19-year-old Koncharoenkai has scored 388 runs from 37 matches. As a wicket-keeper, she has 34 dismissals to her name, including 14 catches and 20 stumpings. She represented Thailand in the 2020 T20 World Cup when they made their maiden appearance, top scoring in their opening encounter with a patient 33 against West Indies.

 

© Women's CricZone © Women's CricZone

Shashikala Siriwardene (Sri Lanka)

Sri Lanka's jersey no. 14, Shashikala Siriwardene, is her team's leading wicket-taker in international cricket. She is the first and only player to have taken 100 wickets in ODIs for the island nation. In 2015, she joined the select band of players to achieve the rare double of scoring 1000 runs and taking 100 wickets in ODIs. During the 2017 World Cup, she became the first Sri Lankan to play in 100 ODIs. In 2019, she became only the second player from Sri Lanka to score 2000 runs in ODIs and and 1000 runs in T20Is, to finish as the team's second-highest run-getter across formats. She is also their highest wicket-taker, and one of only five off-spinners in the world to have accounted for over 100 ODI wickets. She captained Sri Lanka in 98 international matches across formats before announcing her retirement from the international arena at the end of 2020 T20 World Cup held in Australia.

A wily off-spinner and a handy middle-order batter, Siriwardene scored 3126 runs-including nine fifties and took 201 wickets with nine four-wicket hauls to her name. She represented Sri Lanka in four cricket World Cups and five T20 World Cups, and is quite easily their most celebrated player.

 

© Women's CricZone © Women's CricZone

Katey Martin (New Zealand)

Katey Martin, jersey no.15, is one of the most experienced cricketers in New Zealand set up. She made her debut as an 18-year-old in 2003 in a Test against India and is currently the only active cricketer from New Zealand to have played in a Test match. In 2018, she scored 180 runs from four T20Is during the series against West Indies at home and was named player of the series for her three fifties including her career-best score of 65. Only Rachel Priest has more dismissals than her as a wicket-keeper for New Zealand in T20Is. She plays for Otago Sparks in domestic cricket and was the player of the year during the 2016-17 season. She has also represented Melbourne Stars in the Women’s Big Bash League in Australia.

An aggressive batter and a wicket-keeper, Martin has scored 2291 runs-including ten fifties from 160 internationals. She has also kept wickets in 86 matches across formats accounting for 81 dismissals, including 48 catches and 33 stumpings. She was part of the 2009 New Zealand squads that finished runners-up in the T20 and ODI World Cups.

 

© Women's CricZone © Women's CricZone

Iram Javed (Pakistan)

Pakistan’s jersey no.16, Iram Javed is a batter known for her aggressive intent. In 2019, she won the player of the match award for her match-winning 45-ball 55 - her maiden fifty in international cricket - against South Africa in the third T20I in Pietermaritzburg to give Pakistan a 2-1 lead in the five-match series. In the same year, she scored a crucial 21 during the first T20I match against Bangladesh at home to help her side win by 14 runs. She was the second highest run-getter for PCB Dynamites during the National Triangular T20 Women's Cricket Championship for the 2019-20 season.

Having made her debut for Pakistan as a 21-year-old in 2013, Javed has shown glimpses of her talent occasionally, but has been inconsistent over the years. In 55 internationals, she has scored 413 runs and has taken 4 wickets. She was part of the Pakistan side in the 2017 World Cup and also featured in the 2016 and 2020 T20 World Cups.

 

© Women's CricZone © Women's CricZone

Meg Lanning (Australia)

Australia’s Meg Lanning, jersey no.17, is the highest run-getter for Australia in T20Is. In 2014, she won the ICC Women’s T20I Cricketer of the Year award. She broke the record for the highest individual score in T20Is in 2014 and then again in 2019. Her score of 133 not out against England is currently only second to her teammate Alyssa Healy in the list. She is one of the most successful captains in the format having led Australia to three T20 World Cup titles. Her win percentage of 77.08 is the best among those who captained their sides in a minimum of 15 T20Is. She holds the record for the most number of centuries in ODIs with 13 hundreds to her name. She was named ICC Women’s ODI Cricketer of the Year in 2015. In 2019, she led Australia to a world record 18 consecutive wins in the format. She is currently third in the list of highest run-getters for Australia in ODIs.

Known for her attractive strokeplay and astute captaincy, Lanning has already established herself as one of the greats of the game. In 188 internationals, she has scored 6666 runs - including 15 hundreds and 27 fifties. She was part of Australia’s World Cup winning side in 2013 and also played a major role in Australia winning four out of the five T20 World Cups since her debut.

 

publive-image © Women's CricZone

Smriti Mandhana (India)

India’s no.18, Smriti Mandhana, became the first Indian batter to win ICC Women's Cricketer of the Year when she won the Rachael Heyhoe-Flint Award in 2018. She also won the ODI Cricketer of the Year in the same year. Having made her debut as a 17-year-old in 2013, Mandhana has now established herself as one of the best batters in the world. She is the fastest Indian and third-fastest in the world to score 2000 runs in ODIs. She is the only Indian to score ODI centuries in SENA countries and only Mithali Raj has scored more fifty-plus scores for India in the format. In 2014, she scored a crucial fifty on her debut to help India win the Test match against England in Wormsley. She holds the record for the fastest fifty in T20Is for India and she is also the second-fastest Indian to 1000 runs in the format. In 2018, she became the first Indian to play in the Women’s Cricket Super League and she finished the season as the Player of the tournament. She is the youngest captain to lead India in T20Is.

A left-handed batter known for her graceful shots, Mandhana has scored 3822 runs-including four centuries and 30 fifties from 128 internationals. In 2018, she became the recipient of the Arjuna award. She was part of India’s World Cup side in 2017 when they reached the finals and she was the vice-captain of the side that finished as the runners up in T20 World Cup 2020.

 

Sophie Ecclestone (England)

© Women's CricZone © Women's CricZone

England’s Sophie Ecclestone, jersey no.19, is the current number one ranked T20I bowler in the world. She made her debut as a 17-year-old becoming the third-youngest player to play for England in the format. During the 2020 T20 World Cup, she broke the record for the youngest player to take 50 wickets in T20Is. She is currently the second youngest to the mark and is also the third fastest to reach there in terms of innings bowled. Her active streak of taking at least one wicket in her last 18 consecutive T20I innings is a record for England and only two players in the world have done it in more matches. She finished the 2020 T20 World Cup as the leading wicket taker for England having taken eight wickets at an average of 6.12 and an economy rate of 3.23. She was named as one of the five players to watch out for in the first issue of the Women’s CricZone magazine.

A tall, left-arm spinner known for her variations and accuracy, Ecclestone has now become England’s frontline spinner in all formats. She has taken 97 wickets-including three four-wicket hauls from 60 internationals. She was part of the England side that finished as the runners-up in the 2018 T20 World Cup.

 

publive-image © Women's CricZone

Anjum Chopra (India)

Sporting jersey no. 20, Anjum Chopra, was the first player from India to score a century in ODIs and she is also the first player to play 100 ODIs for India. Only Mithali Raj has scored more ODI runs than her career tally of 2856 runs from 127 matches. She led India to its first overseas Test win in 2002 during their tour of South Africa with a match-winning knock of 80 in the first innings. In 2003, she became the first Indian to score 1000 runs in ODIs. An opener known for her batting elegance, Chopra ended her career with 3645 runs-including one century and 22 fifties from 157 internationals.

In 2007, Chopra was honoured with the Arjuna Award and in 2014 she became the recipient of the prestigious Padma Shri honour. She was part of India’s World Cup side in 2005 when they reached the finals. She was also India's leading run-scorer in the Women's World Cup 2000. In 2016, she became the first Indian woman to be awarded the honorary life membership of the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC).

 

publive-image © Women's CricZone

Jess Jonassen (Australia)

Australia’s Jess Jonassen, jersey no.21, is currently the number one ranked ODI bowler in the world. Her (then) career-best figures of 3 for 25 helped Australia defeat England in the 2012 T20 World Cup final. In 2015, she became the first player to be dismissed for 99 on Test debut and her match-winning tally of 153 runs from the match is the third most runs made by a woman on debut in Tests. In 2019, she became the second quickest to pick up 100 ODI wickets. She is the leading wicket-taker for Brisbane Heat in the WBBL with 76 wickets from 75 matches and only Beth Mooney is ahead of her in the run-scoring chart. She played a significant part, both with the bat and the ball, in helping Heat win back-to-back championships in the last two seasons.

In 150 internationals, Jonassen has taken 175 wickets-including three five-wicket hauls. She was part of Australia’s four T20 World Cup triumphs having represented the side in 2012, 2014, 2018, and 2020.

 

publive-image © Women's CricZone

Mignon du Preez (South Africa)

Mignon du Preez, South Africa's jersey no.22, is the most experienced player in their cricketing history, with 234 international caps to her name. She is the leading run-scorer for South Africa in ODIs with 3239 runs from 130 matches. In 2007, playing only in her sixth match she shared an unbeaten 224-run partnership with Johmari Logtenberg against Netherlands to register South Africa’s highest partnership in ODIs. She is the first woman from South Africa to play 100 ODIs. In 2014, she became the first South African player to score a Test century away from home when she scored 102 against India in Mysore. During the 2020 T20 World Cup, she became the first from her team to represent the country in 100 T20Is. She is also the first batter from South Africa to go past 1000 runs in the format.

Du Preez captained South Africa in a record 97 matches across formats. The reliable middle-order batter led them to their first T20 World Cup semi-final in 2014. She was also part of the side that reached the semi-final in 2020 T20 World Cup in Australia.

 

publive-image © Women's CricZone

Suzie Bates (New Zealand)

New Zealand’s Suzie Bates sports jersey no.23 and is the highest run-getter in T20Is with 3243 runs to her name from 119 matches. She is the leading run scorer for New Zealand in ODIs with 4534 runs from 126 matches. She was the player of the tournament in the 2013 Women's World Cup. She was named ICC Women’s ODI Cricketer of the Year in 2013 and 2016. In 2016, she also won the ICC Women’s T20I Cricketer of the Year award. Her 105-ball 168 against Pakistan in Sydney in the 2009 World Cup was the highest individual score by a New Zealand batter in ODIs until Amelia Kerr surpassed it in 2018. Her 124 not out against South Africa in 2018 is the highest individual score by a Kiwi in T20Is. She also represented New Zealand in basketball in the 2008 Beijing Olympics.

Bates, a batting allrounder known her for exploits at the top of the order, has taken 124 wickets in 243 international matches across formats. She was part of New Zealand’s T20 World Cup sides in 2009 and 2010 when they reached the finals. She was also part of the side that finished as the runners-up in the 2009 Women's World Cup in Australia.

 

publive-image © Women's CricZone

Jenny Gunn (England)

England’s jersey no. 24, Jenny Gunn, was the first player ever to feature in 100 T20Is. She was part of the England side that played in the first ever T20I in 2004 and then went on to win the inaugural T20 World Cup with them in 2009. She became the first captain to take a five-wicket in haul in T20Is when she took 5 for 18 against New Zealand in 2013. She ended her career with the second most appearances for England across formats with only Charlotte Edwards ahead of her. She was the leading wicket taker for England in ODIs before Katherine Brunt overtook her. She is one of the only two women to have taken a five-wicket haul in all three formats along with Jhulan Goswami. She is also one of the nine allrounders with the rare double of 1000 runs and 100 wickets in ODIs.

A seam-bowling allrounder, known for her accuracy with the ball, Gunn scored 2702 runs-including seven fifties-and took 240 wickets, including four five-wicket hauls from 259 internationals. She was part of England’s World Cup winning sides in 2009 and 2017.

 

publive-image © Women's CricZone

Jhulan Goswami (India)

Jhulan Goswami, jersey no.25, is the most successful bowler in the history of the game, with over 300 wickets across formats. Her match haul of 10 for 78 in 2006 in Taunton helped India register their first win against England in Test matches. She is the only Indian with a ten-wicket haul in a Test match. She is also part of the select band of players to achieve the rare double of scoring 1000 runs and taking 100 wickets in ODIs. In 2007, she became the first Indian to win ICC Women’s Cricketer of the Year award. She went past Cathryn Fitzpatrick’s tally of 180 ODI wickets to become the highest wicket-taker in 2017. In 2018, she became the only player till date to go past the 200-wicket mark in ODIs, when she dismissed Laura Wolvaardt of South Africa. In 260 internationals, she has taken 321 wickets, including six five-wicket hauls.

In 2010, Goswami was conferred with the Arjuna Award and two years later became the recipient of the prestigious Padma Shri honour. She was part of India’s World Cup sides in 2005 and 2017 when they reached the finals.

 

© Women's CricZone © Women's CricZone

Katherine Brunt (England)

England's Katherine Brunt, jersey no. 26, is one of the fastest bowlers the game has seen. She is the leading wicket taker for England in ODIs with 150 wickets from 123 matches. Her allround performance in the second Test against Australia in 2005 led England to their first Ashes series win in 42 years. She was the player of the final for her spell of 3 for 6 against New Zealand during England’s triumph in the inaugural T20 World Cup in 2009 - the best figures in a T20 World Cup final until Megan Schutt got a four-fer against India this year. Her spell of 6 for 69 against Australia in 2009 in Worcester are the best bowling figures for England in Ashes Tests at home.

An aggressive player by nature, Brunt has taken 274 wickets-including seven five-wicket hauls from 217 internationals. The bowling allrounder was an important member of England’s World Cup winning sides in 2009 and 2017.

 

© Women's CricZone © Women's CricZone

Karen Rolton (Australia)

Jersey no.27, Karen Rolton was the first recipient of the ICC Women’s Cricketer of the Year award in 2006. In 2001, she scored a (then) record 209 not out against England in Leeds. A few years later, she became the first player to score a century in a World Cup final with a match-winning 107 not out against India in 2005. Her 53-ball 96 not out against England that same year, is still the record for the highest individual score on T20I debut. A top-order batter and medium pacer, Rolton is one of the greats of the women's game with a batting average of nearly 50 in all three formats. She ended her career with 6221 runs -including 10 hundreds and 40 fifties - and 102 wickets from 170 internationals.

The left-hander was part Australia’s World Cup winning sides in 1997 and 2005. In 2016 she was inducted into ICC’s Hall of Fame becoming the sixth woman to receive the honour.

 

 

© Women's CricZone © Women's CricZone

Danielle Wyatt (England)

Jersey no. 28, Danielle Wyatt was the first player to score a century in the second innings of a T20I match, when she struck a 57-ball 100 against Australia in Canberra in 2017. She is the only player to score two T20I centuries in chases - the second coming against India, when England hunted down a mammoth 199 in Mumbai. Having started off as an off-spinning allrounder, Wyatt has now become one of England's best short-form batters, having established herself at the top of the order. In 183 internationals, she has scored 2616 runs - including three hundreds and eight fifties - and taken 73 wickets.

In 2019, she became the first English batter to score a century in the now defunct Women's Cricket Super League. She has also featured in the Women's Big Bash League in Australia and the Women's T20 Challenge in India.

 

 

© Women's CricZone © Women's CricZone

Rumana Ahmed (Bangladesh)

Bangladesh's jersey No. 29, Rumana Ahmed is one of Bangladesh's most decorated players. A leg-spinning allrounder, Rumana is the country's second highest run-getter and second-highest wicket-taker in international cricket with over 1500 runs and 99 wickets to her credit. She played a vital role in Bangladesh's 2018 Asia Cup triumph in Kuala Lumpur, being named player of the final in her team's three-wicket win over India.
Subscribe